There’s no “right” way to write, but knowing the right tricks can make your manuscript sound sensational.

Here are three more tips to hone your talents:

Punctuate with Purpose

Great writing has rhythm and flow, as practiced authors know. Used correctly, punctuation leads you along and says: Stop! Look here!

No one likes to read blocks of unbroken copy or obnoxious run-on sentences because it taxes our brains making it much harder to focus on the words with each passing thought which is not to mention that we often lose track of the point the author was trying to make in the first place because we don’t converse with one another in this manner so why choose to write that way it simply makes no sense.

Punctuate—early and often—to make your thoughts manageable (parenthesis help too!).

Start in the Middle

Writer’s block can be a big obstacle, so go around it.

We often hit this wall because we’re programmed to write in order: title first, then the intro, followed by the main idea, and, finally, our conclusion.

If you’re stuck, simply jump ahead to something you know you want to say.

Even if that’s only a line, jot it down, and put it to the side. Then, do it again. And again.

Later, you can decide where these “pieces” fit best. All that’s important now is revving your creative engine—you’ll be surprised how fast you go from 0 good ideas to 60.

Seek and Destroy Subordinating Conjunctions

In order to become a better writer, we must learn to eliminate subordinating conjunctions as soon as possible, in so much as these parts of speech that join dependent and independent clauses can be unnecessary provided that your point comes across.

To become a better writer, we must learn to eliminate subordinating conjunctions. These parts of speech that join dependent and independent clauses can be unnecessary.

Bonus Tip

Use short words and few of them.

The end.