People look at a masterpiece and say, “I could never paint that!”

Because we believe only “creative people” make good artists…

Or musicians…

Or writers…

Wrong!

Like art and music, writing is tied to technique as much as talent.

Maybe you’re not Picasso or Pollini, but with practice, you can still pen a paper to be proud of:

Lead with the Lead

Always get right to the point. Introduce the main idea immediately. If not in the title, in the first line or two. Say it clear and direct: Reading this will make you a better writer.

Rhyme with Reason

Used sparingly, sets of similar-sounding syllables add energy and appeal to any literary arrangement.

You attend Sunday sermon—the pastor shouts! Then whispers softly. Suddenly arms FLY in the air! Followed by stillness, silence…

An orator has many ways to bring words to life—the writer, far fewer.

Learn to love alliteration.

Don’t Be Shy

Fear of self-expression is good writing’s greatest enemy.

Often, we avoid wordplay, artful articulation, or sounding “too clever” to avoid scrutiny.

Be bold. Bare your mind. Write the words you hear, and feel.

Not those you simply feel others want to hear.

Above all, be memorable.

Take the Time it Takes

It took 20 minutes to type this post—and 480 words to write it.

When taking wordcount, don’t get caught up in the hours it took to get there.

In fact, 100 well-written words can take 10 times longer to compose than 1,000 ill-chosen ones.

Pro tip: Prepare a first draft as soon as possible, then revisit your work two or three times over a week, making small improvements.

By treating each sentence as a brushstroke and perfecting the form behind it, you can better your writing in leaps and bounds.

It’s much easier than most think.